48%
Yes
52%
No
40%
Yes
27%
No
7%
Yes, this will decrease the amount of misinformation patients receive
13%
No, but the doctors should be required to disclose that the advice contradicts contemporary scientific consensus
2%
Yes, and the doctors should also lose their medical license
9%
No, only when the advice was proven to harm the patient
3%
No, scientific consensus can quickly change and patients should be allowed to try unconventional ideas

Historical Results

See how support for each position on “Medical Consensus” has changed over time for 8.7k UK voters.

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Historical Importance

See how importance of “Medical Consensus” has changed over time for 8.7k UK voters.

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Other Popular Answers

Unique answers from UK users whose views extended beyond the provided choices.

 @9JBZT7N answered…4mos4MO

This depends on the case in question. Anti vaccine yes, but things like homeopathic remedies no (unless advised in place of life saving treatment)

 @9HRMVMYanswered…5mos5MO

Yes, however patients should be offered all the information available in order to choose their own course of treatment.

 @9GZD6SJanswered…6mos6MO

Depends, generally doctors should stick to contemporary scientific consensus but if there ideas works better or just as well then it should be taken into consideration.

 @9GLZWCQanswered…7mos7MO

No, medical boards should be fined and scrutinised for NOT keeping upto date with actual cutting edge science. The GMC does not own "contemporary scientific consensus"; they are decades behind.

 @9GJDDQ6answered…7mos7MO

Yes, but only if the advice was proven to harm the patient OR if the doctor did not disclose that this advice contradicts contemporary scientific consensus

 @9GDVMLKanswered…7mos7MO

No, so long as the advice is issued with appropriate information for the patient to have informed consent.